By The Jewish Star:

Cedarhurst paused to remember the loss, the heroism, and the miracles of 9/11, at the village’s annual commemoration on Sunday.

In his invocation, Rabbi Shay Schachter (top right photo) of the Young Israel of Woodmere said, “we pray that G-d, the Master and Creator of the world, grant us all the strength and the fortitude to stand firm together against all forms of terror, of extremism, of bigotry, of hatred, of racism, and of all evil that can be found in different forms in our world.”

“We have a solemn obligation to those who died or were injured on Sept. 11th to never forget what happened,” said Mayor Benjamin Weinstock (bottom). “We saw evil, but we also saw the best of America.”

Ari Schonburn (middle), a 9/11 survivor and author of “Miracles and Fate on 78,” recalled his experiences that day. He was waiting to change elevators on the 78th floor when the first plane hit.

Lawrence-Cedarhurst Fire Department Chief David Campbell, saluting during the playing of Taps, read the names of local 9/11 victims.

This was an interview that I did on the program Fox and Friends the morning of September 7th, 2011 talking about my new book and the tenth anniversary of 9/11.

Fox and Friends is the #1 rated TV show in its time slot in the country, with nearly two million daily viewers. Thanks so much to my great friend Lee Kushnir at Fox for making this possible

The first segment is the one that was on live TV, and the second segment is the follow-up that appeared on the internet portion of the program called the After the Show Show. It goes more in
depth into my story.

I’m pleased to let you know that I was able to participate in a special program on Shalom TV about the tenth anniversary of 9/11. The full program can be viewed above. The great people at Shalom TV were also kind enough to put the segment in the featured programming section of their website.

MSNBCAri Schonbrun experienced first-hand the terror of Sept. 11, 2001, surviving a harrowing escape from the 78th floor of the World Trade Center, and he came away with a conclusion that might be surprising. The sequence of events that led him to survive that day — he would never call them coincidences — reinforced his belief in God and strengthened his faith as an Orthodox

Jew. Schonbrun, 49, an executive at Cantor Fitzgerald brokerage, should have been in his office on the 101st floor at 8:46 that morning, but he was running late because he had stayed at home to finish a book order with his 8-year-old son. Nobody on that floor of the north tower was heard from after the impact of American Airlines Flight 11.

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Daily News

Cantor Fitzgerald executive Ari Schonbrun got an early start Sept. 11. It was a good thing, too. With the Jewish holidays coming up, he had a lot of work to cram into a compressed schedule. So there was a lilt in his voice as he swung open the door of his Cedarhurst, L.

I., home, stepped out and yelled to his wife, Joyce, “I’m leaving!

” And there was a note of aggravation when she hollered back: “Did you do Baruch’s book order? You’re not leaving until you do the book order.

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Newsweek 911 Cover

 Except for the place where they died, Bill Feehan and Mohamed Atta would seem to have had absolutely nothing in common. Feehan rescued people; Atta killed them. As a lifelong firefighter who rose to become first deputy commissioner of the New York City Fire Department, Feehan was directly or indirectly responsible for saving thousands of lives. As a suicidal terrorist who flew American Airlines Flight 11 into the North Tower of the World Trade Center, Atta murdered thousands, including Bill Feehan, who was helping a woman at the base of the North Tower when the building collapsed on him. Any suggestion of moral equivalence between the two men is repugnant. And yet, it must be said, both believed in the rightness of their causes with absolute certainty. It might be more comforting to think that Atta was stark raving mad, but true madmen, who are usually dysfunctional, don’t work with Atta’s calm purpose. No one wants to think that even a seminormal human being–indeed, nearly a score of them–could do what the terrorists did on September 11. In a world of moral relativism, we prefer psychological explanations; no one wishes to stare directly into the face of evil.

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