I’m still floating. I was in Philly yesterday and spoke in 2 venues. The first was a boys high school. I still have a hard time dealing with the fact that almost none of the kids that I spoke to were alive on 9/11/2001. But they were totally mesmerized. Great group of kids.

In the evening, I spoke for an organization called Russian American Jewish Experience – RAJE. What an incredible audience. I spoke for an hour and they still wanted more. The program ended at 9:15 but I didn’t leave until 10:30. People kept coming over to me wanting to know more, wanting to hear more. They were so inspired. Needless to say I sold a bunch of books as well.

Therefore I have decided that any organization that books me to speak between now and February 28th, whether it be a for-profit corporation or a non-profit, I will be charging a discounted rate of $1,800.

In order to get this special discounted rate, go to my website Arischonbrun.com, click on the “book an event” tab and under “promo code” type in 1800.

This evening is the beginning of Yom Kippur, the holiest day in the Jewish calendar. We believe that God judges the entire world on this day. We believe that now is an auspicious time to beseech God and ask that he judge the world favorably and give all of us a life of health wealth and happiness.

If you read my book or heard me speak, you will know that I talk about listening to God’s whispers. If we look at the past year we see that there have been many tragedies. Some man-made, some made by the Supreme Being that controls the world. Terrorist attacks, Earthquakes, Hurricanes, Floods, Famine, The Threat of Nuclear War, the list goes on and on. I believe that God is not whispering to us. He is yelling loud and clear; YOU HAVE TO CHANGE YOUR WAYS. He is not happy with what we are doing. He is throwing brick after brick at us. And what are we doing?

I talk about the definition of insanity, doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. And yet that is what we are still doing. We are not making any changes.

It is time for each of us to take upon ourselves to change for the better. Kindness, Smiles, Charity, Helping those that can’t help themselves, good deeds. How hard is it???? It is not hard. Do something for 30 days and it becomes a habit.

Last but not least, there is prayer. There is only so much that we can do. The rest is up to God. That’s why we need prayer.

I pray that God grants all of us a year of Health, Wealth, and Happiness and finally put an end to all the strife in the world.

If you agree with this message please share it.

If this message offends you in any way shape or form, please, please, just disregard it and don’t hold it against me. I am just putting out my thoughts and feelings.

Gmar Chatima Tova,
Ari

Hard to believe it is 16 years. Just under 3,000 people lost their lives that day. I personally lost 658 friends and co-workers on that day. Only through the Grace of God am I around today.

I spoke to a group of High School students this morning and the oldest one in the room was just a year old when 9/11 happened. Like the Korean war for me, to them, it is just another page in the history books.

They don’t realize that the entire world changed that day. For these kids, life today is normal. It is normal to have security guards in the schools. It is normal that I have to take off my shoes in order to board a plane. It is normal that I have to walk through a metal detector to board a plane or to go to a ballgame or walk into many public places. “If you see something, say something” is normal.

It is unfortunate that kids growing up today live in such a “normal” society. The United States is the greatest country on the face of the planet and yet this is our “normal”.

I pray that the words of the prophet Isaiah will soon ring true: “they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks: nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more.”

May peace reign speedily in our days. Amen.

Ari Schonbrun speaks in Parise Park, Cedarhurst, NY on September 11th, 2017. Ari survived 9/11 and rescued a co-worker down 78 flights to safety. His story has since been told around the world. Listen to his story here:

To: YOU

Date: TODAY

From: THE BOSS

Subject: YOURSELF

Reference: LIFE

I am G-d. Today I will be handling all of your problems. Please remember that I do not need your help.

If life happens to deliver a situation to you that you cannot handle, do not attempt to resolve it. Kindly put it in the SFGTD (something for G-d to do) box. All situations will be resolved, but in My time, not yours.

Once the matter is placed into the box, do not hold onto it by worrying about it. Instead, focus on all the wonderful things that are present in your life now.

If you find yourself stuck in traffic; Don’t despair. There are people in this world for whom driving is an unheard of privilege.

Should you have a bad day at work; Think of the man who has been out of work for years.

Should you despair over a relationship gone bad; Think of the person who has never known what it’s like to love and be loved in return.

Should you grieve the passing of another weekend; Think of the woman in dire straits, working twelve hours a day, seven days a week to feed her children.

Should your car break down, leaving you miles away from assistance; Think of the paraplegic who would love the opportunity to take that walk.

Should you notice a new gray hair in the mirror; Think of the cancer patient in chemo who wishes she had hair to examine.

Should you find yourself at a loss and pondering what is life all about, asking what is my purpose? Be thankful. There are those who didn’t live long enough to get the opportunity.

Should you find yourself the victim of other people’s bitterness, ignorance, smallness or insecurities; Remember, things could be worse. You could be one of them!

Should you decide to send this to a friend; Thank you, you may have touched their life in ways you will never know!  G-D

Two traveling angels stopped to spend the night in the home of a wealthy family.  The family was rude and refused to let the angels stay in the mansion’s guest room. Instead, the angels were given a small space in the cold basement.

As they made their bed on the hard floor, the older angel saw a hole in the wall and repaired it. When the younger angel asked why, the older angel replied, “Things aren’t always what they seem.”

The next night the pair came to rest at the house of a very poor, but very hospitable farmer and his wife. After sharing what little food they had, the couple let the angels sleep in their bed where they could have a good night’s rest. When the sun came up the next morning the angels found the farmer and his wife in tears. Their only cow, whose milk had been their sole income, lay dead in the field. The younger angel was infuriated and asked the older angel how could you have let this happen? The first man had everything, yet you helped him, he accused. The second family had little but was willing to share everything, and you let the cow die. “Things aren’t always what they seem,” the older angel replied.

“When we stayed in the basement of the mansion, I noticed there was gold stored in that hole in the wall. Since the owner was so obsessed with greed and unwilling to share his good fortune, I sealed the wall so he wouldn’t find it.”

“Then last night as we slept in the farmers bed, the angel of death came for his wife. I gave him the cow instead. Things aren’t always what they seem.”

Sometimes that is exactly what happens when things don’t turn out the way they should. If you have faith, you just need to trust that every outcome is always to your advantage. You just might not know it until some time later…

Some people come into our lives and quickly go
Some people become friends and stay awhile…
leaving beautiful footprints on our hearts…
and we are never quite the same because we have made a good friend!!

Yesterday is history. Tomorrow a mystery. Today is a gift.
That’s why it’s called the present!

I think this is special…live and savor every moment… This is not a dress rehearsal!

As told by Dr. Malik Douglas – Assistant Principal

A boy went to the Principal and said “Ma’am, I won’t be coming to School anymore.”

The Principal responded “But why?”

The boy said, “Ah! I saw a teacher speaking badly of another teacher. Another teacher can’t read well. The staff is not good. Students aren’t kind to each other. There are so many wrong things happening in the Schooĺ.”

The Principal replied, “OK. But before you go, do me a favor. Take a glass full of water and walk three times around the School without spilling a drop on the floor. Afterwards, you may leave the School if you desire.”

The boy thought that should be easy enough. And the boy walked three times around as the Principal had asked. When he finished, he told the Principal he was ready to leave.

The Principal asked, “When you were walking around the School, did you see a Teacher speaking bad about another Teacher?”

The boy replied “no.”

“Did you see any students being unkind?”

“No”

“You know why?”

“No”

“You were focused on the glass. You were focused on making sure you didn’t spill any water. It’s the same with life. When our focus is on our priorities, we don’t have time to see the mistakes of others.”

Moral: We should concentrate more on our priorities and not on others mistakes. Don’t let the dysfunction of the world distract you.

The following is a story word-for-word by Blair P.Grubb, M.D. – Medical College of Ohio (Printed in Farbrengen Magazine)

“Many years ago, after graduating from Medical school, I worked for several months in a clinic in El Valle, a little town in the central highlands of the Dominican Republic. The staff at the clinic consisted of me, another physician fresh out of school, and a nurse – all under the supervision of a doctor who’d just completed his residency. Together, the four of us lived and worked in a cinder block building with two examination rooms, a small surgical area, a waiting room, and some tiny sleeping quarters.

Since the nearest hospital was more than an hour and a half’s drive away, we offered the only medical care for the entire region. Despite our meager stores of drugs and equipment, we saw nearly 70 patients each day and treated every conceivable disorder. People would literally walk barefoot for a day to come to our clinic, and often were hopelessly ill. I felt as if I’d somehow been transported back in time to a different reality, far from the one I had known.

Although I spoke workable Spanish, communication was often difficult because many of our patients were French-speaking migrant workers from Haiti who spoke Spanish haltingly. Once, a young Haitian woman was brought to us in a state of shock after her arm was mangled by a threshing machine. We rushed her to our makeshift operating room and poured IV fluids into her as we struggled to control the bleeding.

Her hematocrit was so low it barely registered on our equipment. She needed blood badly, and it was clear that we were going to lose her without it. The sole method we had for giving blood was a direct transfusion from one person to another. With our rudimentary blood-typing kit, the only potential donor we could find was her younger brother. His Spanish was poor, but he seemed to understand when we explained that we needed to take some of his blood to save his sister. He turned a little pale, sat silent for a moment, and asked if there was any other way. ‘No,’ I replied, and he slowly nodded his head in agreement.

We placed an IV on him and began transfusing his sister. Almost immediately, she started regaining her color. Her brother smiled as he saw this, then turned his head to me, and in his soft, broken Spanish asked, ‘Cuando voy a morir?’ – ‘When will I die?‘ I stood dumbfounded, and then realized he’d misunderstood our explanations and thought we needed all his blood to save his sister.

The situation seemed humorous until a stunned fact hit me. This child, this precious child with hardly a moment’s hesitation, had been willing to sacrifice his life to save the sister he loved. At that moment, I stood in awe of this boy. As I looked down at him, his face glowed with a kind of radiance, and despite his fear, he seemed at peace.”

So ask yourself, what am I thankful for today. Who may have been willing to give to me everything that they have to give? And what would I be willing to give to others?

Once upon a time a daughter complained to her father that her life was miserable and that she didn’t know how she was going to make it. She was tired of fighting and struggling all the time. It seemed just as one problem was solved, another one soon followed.

Her father, a chef, took her to the kitchen. He filled three pots with water and placed each on a high fire. Once the three pots began to boil, he placed potatoes in one pot, eggs in the second pot, and ground coffee beans in the third pot.

He then let them sit and boil, without saying a word to his daughter. The daughter moaned and impatiently waited, wondering what he was doing.

After twenty minutes he turned off the burners. He took the potatoes out of the pot and placed them in a bowl. He pulled the eggs out and placed them in a bowl.

He then ladled the coffee out and placed it in a cup. Turning to her he asked. “Daughter, what do you see?”

“Potatoes, eggs, and coffee,” she hastily replied.

“Look closer,” he said, “and touch the potatoes.” She did and noted that they were soft. He then asked her to take an egg and break it. After pulling off the shell, she observed the hard-boiled egg. Finally, he asked her to sip the coffee. Its rich aroma brought a smile to her face.

“Father, what does this mean?” she asked.

He then explained that the potatoes, the eggs and coffee beans had each faced the same adversity– the boiling water.

However, each one reacted differently.

The potato went in strong, hard, and unrelenting, but in boiling water, it became soft and weak.

The egg was fragile, with the thin outer shell protecting its liquid interior until it was put in the boiling water. Then the inside of the egg became hard.

However, the ground coffee beans were unique. After they were exposed to the boiling water, they changed the water and created something new.

“Which are you,” he asked his daughter. “When adversity knocks on your door, how do you respond? Are you a potato, an egg, or a coffee bean? ”

Moral: In life, things happen around us, things happen to us, but the only thing that truly matters is what happens within us.

Which one are you?